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The Navdy HUD (Heads Up Display) system sits on your dashboard between your steering wheel and the windshield with a display that projects an image that appears to float six feet in front of the windshield. The projected display connects to your iPhone or Android phone via your favorite apps like Google Maps to help you navigate around town without looking down at a phone or over at a center console.

It is also controlled via gestures so even when you do get a call, you’re not fumbling for your phone. Just give a thumbs up above the steering wheel to answer and swipe to hang up. You will be notified of who’s calling on the display alongside your directions.

Voice control can be used to take care of text messages. This means messages can be read aloud to you while you’re driving, so you’re not reading them when you should be merging lanes. It's like driving in the future!

Pre-order here



Reported by Tijn Benedek (2014-09-02 08:52:39)

In summertime, Sharifi-ha House offers an open /transparent /perforated volume with wide, large terraces. In contrast, during Tehran’s cold, snowy winters the volume closes down, offering minimal openings and a total absence of those wide summer terraces. In this project, the challenges to the concepts of introverted/extroverted typology led to an exciting spatial transformation of an ever-changing residential building.

From the architect:

Uncertainty and flexibility lie at the heart of this project’s design concept. The sensational, spatial qualities of the interiors, as well as the formal configuration of its exterior, directly respond to the displacement of turning boxes that lead the building’s volume to become open or closed, introverted or extroverted. These changes may occur according to changing seasons or functional scenarios.



Reported by Tijn Benedek (2014-08-28 16:33:04)

After many years of consistently producing one of the more interesting monthly publications out there among many other things, it was a natural step for the magazine’s team to create ‘The Monocle Guide to Good Business’. As the guide is not a traditional business book, but rather gives advice on how to go from clever fledgling idea to success story and introduces people with inspiring stories; with the high quality of products Monocle puts out, they seem to have to perfect fit to share some valuable insights what works best. At this point Monocle delivers an unique global briefing on global affairs, business, culture and design. Alongside the magazine, Monocle has created a 24-hour radio station, a film-rich website, retail ventures around the globe, and cafés in Tokyo and London, with very likely more to come in the future.




Reported by Tijn Benedek (2014-08-28 16:29:53)

For those fascinated with the often mishandled craft of home brewing, Norse Hutchens provides the correct kits needed to explore the ancient art and science. Alongside wine, moonshine and gin making kits, the label’s latest kit allows you to explore the production of Japanese sake. Equipped with a manual, all the necessary ingredients (rice, yeast, sake additives) and utensils — jugs, plastic tubing, rubber stoppers and muslin bag — you can now bring a piece of traditional craft to your kitchen without venturing to Kobe’s breweries. Priced at $60 USD, head to uncommongoods for more information on the kit.

Source: Hypebeast



Reported by Tijn Benedek (2014-08-26 14:23:42)

Canadian firm Christopher Simmonds Architect have  helped realise this contemporary residence in the suburbs of the country’s capital, Ottawa. While the exterior bares many of the cubist hallmarks that have come to be associated with modern architecture since the advent of Le Corbusier, it’s the interior that really offers something special. The floor-to-ceiling windows on both walls of the top deck create an exceptionally light living area in which the sitting room, dining area and kitchen all flow into one another; meanwhile, the use of rich, caramel-esque woods for the dining table, kitchen counter, stairs and bannisters breaks up the grey tones of the furniture perfectly. This theme is extended throughout the property, from the bathroom to the bedroom, creating a harmonious space with a clearly defined aesthetic across all areas.



Reported by Tijn Benedek (2014-08-21 16:28:20)